First Nations Elders Support Protection

June 7th, 2012

 

Latest Peel Watershed News

Peel Elders Renew Calls for Watershed Protection

“A special gathering to give Peel River watershed elders a chance to talk about the region was held Saturday, May 26,  at a Tr’ondek Hwech’in camp near the Dempster Highway in the Yukon.”

Visit the Yukon News

Peel Protestors Shut Down Legislature, May 11

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

 

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, contact jpeepreatyahoodotca, or post your comment or question in this blog.

 

Yukon Government Tosses Out Recommended Peel Watershed Plan

February 16th, 2012
A Yukon Government media release says that “eight core principles will be used to guide modifications and completion of the Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan.”
“The Yukon government continues to support an approach that balances access for industry and other users while establishing protection in key habitat areas in the Peel region. The principles will provide guidance for the timely completion of the remaining steps in this important land use planning process.”
The Yukon government will use these new principles “to guide strategic modifications to the draft Peel Plan”. The Government of Yukon principles are:
1. Special Protection for Key Areas
2. Manage Intensity of Use
3. Respect the First Nation Final Agreements
4. Respect the Importance of all Sectors of the Economy
5. Respect Private Interests
6. Active Management
7. Future Looking
8. Practical and Affordable
What Is the Yukon Government Saying?
At first glance, these principles may sound reasonable, but in fact they are aimed at converting the wild Peel watershed into a roaded, fragmented and developed landscape with a few “special” protected areas.
In response to this rejection of the recommended plan supported by First Nations and the public, CPAWS Yukon and the Yukon Conservation Society said they “condemn the Yukon government’s attempt to hijack the land-use planning process and open the Peel Watershed to industrial development.”
“… government imposed eight new principles designed to allow roads, uranium, coal and hard rock mining, and oil and gas development in one of the last intact boreal ecosystems on the continent.
“We hoped for more from the Pasloski government, but it is following the same unilateral approach used by the previous Fentie government,” said Mike Dehn, Executive Director of the Yukon Chapter of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society. “The government says it listens to the public, but then tosses out seven years of sound work and does what it wants.
“It is a reckless approach that puts government and the mining industry at odds with the wishes of the public and First Nations. That just provokes protests and, potentially long, drawn out lawsuits, which is poison to potential investors in the territory. This approach is not good for anyone.”
“Now, the government has concocted new principles, without any discussion with its partners, to simply gut a plan it doesn’t like.”
The CPAWS and YCS media release goes on to say that “the final Peel Watershed land-use plan reflects Yukoners’ overwhelming desire to see the region protected while allowing some economic development. The plan sets aside 55 per cent of the Peel Watershed as protected areas. Another 25 per cent of the region is assigned less secure interim ” Yukon government talks about balance, but the land-use planning commission has already produced a balanced plan,” said Karen Baltgailis, Executive Director of the Yukon Conservation Society. “It not only balances interests in the Peel, but counterbalances rampant development happening throughout the territory.”
“The public has been waiting for government to respond to the final Peel plan for months. Now, in the face of widespread public support for a wild Peel, government is trying to gut the process in an underhanded way,” said Dehn. “In doing so, the government threatens to undermine the established land-use planning process, which, in turn, would damage investor confidence in the territory as a safe place to invest.”

Distant alpine ridges beckon in the Hart River wilderness. J. Peepre

Peel Watershed Decision Expected in 2012

January 2nd, 2012

The politics of the Peel – what was said in the Yukon legislature in December, 2011:

Mr. Tredger (NDP Official Opposition):  “The Peel is one of the last remaining pristine watersheds in the world. The Final Recommended Peel Watershed Regional Land Use Plan recommended full and interim protection of 80 percent of the Peel watershed. Affected First Nations, nearby communities and the majority of Yukoners have, in the spirit of compromise, accepted this balanced plan. In January 2010, the Yukon government signed a letter of understanding with their First Nation partners. This letter had a series of timelines on when further consultations would take place and stated that a final decision would be reached in November 2011. These timelines have been missed. What is this government’s plan to get the Peel land use planning process back on track”?

Hon. Mr. Cathers (Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources):  “The Yukon government is committed to following the process. I would remind the member that the Yukon government, under the Umbrella Final Agreement, has a duty to take that final recommended plan to determine where we believe it can be made better and then engage in a final round of public consultation. That’s exactly what we’re going to do”.

[The final round of public consultations is expected in the spring of 2012, but the Yukon Party government has already said it rejects the Recommended Plan, and declared it supports industrial development in the Peel watershed, as shown again by the Minister's comments below.]

“We believe that debate over the Peel planning process has become unnecessarily polarized and politicized. The debate has also at times lost touch with reality. It’s time to shift the debate from whether to protect the environment in the Peel to how to best protect the environment of the Peel while allowing responsible use. We believe that most Yukoners actually share common values. Yukoners value wilderness beauty and healthy ecosystems, but also want a strong, diversified economy that provides employment for their friends, families and communities”.

[In fact, public opinion surveys show strong public support for protecting 80% of the Peel watershed - First Nations, affected communities near the Peel, and the public do not want industrial development in the Peel, but do support responsible resource use outside the watershed. The Yukon Party is out of touch with public opinion and affected First Nations aspirations, and that is why the debate is cast as "polarized and politicized'.]

“We are … also committing to extending the moratorium on staking until September 2012″.

[This is a positive decision that will allow the final consultations and decisions to be made without the spectacle of a simultaneous staking rush in the Peel watershed. However, the moratorium would be more effective if extended until 2013.]

Northern sun on Wernecke Mountains - J. Peepre

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $2.99 HST + Shipping = $33.00 CDN. For more information, contact jpeepreatyahoodotca or post your comment or question in this blog.

Ancient Peoples of the Peel

November 20th, 2011

 

Geologic artistry in the canyon country of the Hart River.  J Peepre.

In traditional times, the rewards of life on the land were hard won. People travelled great distances to survive, carrying their livelihoods with them as they hunted, and shaping their lives to the ways of the animals on which they depended.  They fashioned all they needed—weapons, boats, cooking utensils, even boats– from stone, wood and the many different parts of caribou and other animals. Home was where the animals were—the winter hunt camps, the summer fish camps.

For the Tetl’it Gwich’in, the Peel was the centre of their world. They called it Teetl’it njik, meaning “along the head of the waters.” Tetl’it Gwich’in means “people who live at the head of the waters.” They were mountain people, hunting caribou throughout the valleys of the Richardson and Ogilvie mountains for most of the year. In summer, they descended to the Peel River and fished.

Other First Nations also travelled the mountains and valleys of this vast region during their yearly cycles. The Nacho Nyak Dun are “big river people,” and live on the banks of the Stewart River in Mayo, Yukon, south of the Wernecke Mountains. They are the most northern of the Yukon’s Tutchone First Nations, and their lives are oriented mainly towards the Yukon River, which runs roughly through the middle of Tutchone traditional territory.

But the Peel watershed has always been important to them as well. They would climb into the Wernecke and Ogilvie Mountains to snare Dall sheep as its meat was a special delicacy, and its supple soft skins were used for making children’s clothing. When barren-ground caribou wintered in the Peel watershed, the word would spread and they travelled over the mountains to hunt them. In more recent times, Nacho Nyak Dun also trapped and prospected in the Peel watershed.

Their life revolved around chinook salmon, which spawn every summer in the Stewart, a tributary of the Yukon River, which has the world’s longest run of migrating chinook salmon. In traditional times, the late summer runs of spawning salmon were immense—a natural spectacle on a par with the movement of the great herds of barren-ground caribou. At favoured fish camps, such as Fraser Falls, the Nacho Nyak set up weirs and wove funnel-shaped fish traps out of willow branches. Everyone stayed busy catching, cleaning and drying fish—setting aside large quantities of dried salmon for winter.

The seasonal round was similar for the Tr’ondek Hwech’in—“people of the river” in their Han language. They now live in Dawson City, where the annual run of salmon on the Yukon River is still a seasonal highlight. In fall the Han used to move north to hunt, trap and pick berries, and their traditional territory includes parts of the Hart River watershed and the entire Ogilvie and Blackstone river drainages.

 

(adapted from Wild Rivers of the Peel Watershed, 2008)

 

David Suzuki Calls for Peel Watershed Protection

September 19th, 2011

After an inspiring two week journey with his family and friends on the Hart River this summer, renowned Canadian scientist and conservationist David Suzuki did not hesitate to call for protection of the entire Peel watershed. We were privileged to join David and his wife, Tara Cullis on the raft and canoe trip down the Hart – a river of infinite variety with sinuous slow-moving channels and frothy fast waters, stunning castellated ridges, canyons, and sweeping forested valleys. Other family members on the expedition were daughter Sarika Cullis-Suzuki, and son, Yukon resident Troy Suzuki. The Hart is one of four major wild tributaries of the Peel recommended for protection by the Peel Watershed Land Use Planning Commission, a plan endorsed by the region’s First Nations.

While it is clear that David and his family were moved by the natural beauty and ecological vitality of this place, and the contribution the Peel watershed could make to conservation in Canada’s North, their fellow travellers relished the lively and far-reaching conversations with Canada’s leading family for the environment. David Suzuki reminded us that, although protecting the Peel watershed is a vital imperative, it is still only one facet reflecting the urgent need to re-shape the way we think about nature, the economy, and our place on the planet.

Read Sarah Locke’s Yukon News article on the Hart River journey:

Watch a video with David Suzuki on the Peel (by Marten Berkman):

http://youtu.be/tOWU0pypS9M

Read the Yukon News article on David Suzuki’s perspective:

 

David Suzuki fly-fishing for grayling on the Hart River. Juri Peepre

 

To read the recommended Peel watershed land use plan.

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

 

Sarah and Troy relax on Sheep Cave Mountain, on the Hart River. Juri Peepre

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Peel Watershed Plan Calls for 80% Protection

July 26th, 2011

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission released its much awaited final recommended land use plan today. In a bold response to earlier Yukon government criticism that the draft plan had too much protection, the Commission remained firm in recommending that 80% of the Peel watershed be protected, in two types of conservation areas. The plan calls for a large Special Management Area, a contiguous core protected area encompassing the entire Three Rivers region, including the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume watersheds – about 55% of the Peel watershed.

In the second type of conservation area, the Hart River is a proposed Wilderness Area, which provides for interim protection. Other watersheds, such as the Blackstone River on the western side of the Peel region, are within an Integrated Management Zone. Allowing for new industrial development in 20% of the watershed, and proposing interim protection in the Wilderness Areas, the Commission has shown a willingness to compromise. The Plan falls short of recommending protection for 100% of the watershed, as called for by First Nations and conservation groups, but remains a bold proposal of global importance.

This is a visionary plan for the Peel watershed, and, if accepted by the Yukon government, will result in one of the largest protected areas in North America. It deserves our support.

The last round of public consultations on the plan will be from mid-August until mid-September. We expect a Yukon government decision on the future of the watershed in late October, but the mandatory fall election may push that date.

To read the recommended land use plan, visit:

Globe & Mail Features the Peel Watershed, July 23

Read Bruce Kirkby’s excellent article on why Canadians need to protect the Peel watershed wilderness:

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Recommended Peel Watershed Plan Imminent

July 23rd, 2011

Globe & Mail Features the Peel Watershed, July 23

Read Bruce Kirkby’s excellent article on why Canadians need to protect the Peel watershed wilderness:

The Peel Planning Commission will release its final recommended land use plan on July 25. Will they stay true to their call for protecting 80% of this extraordinary constellation of wild rivers? The last round of public consultations on the plan will be from mid-August until mid-September. We expect a Yukon government decision on the future of the watershed in late October, but the mandatory fall election may push that date.

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

The June issue of Canadian Geographic features the Snake River, one of the celebrated Three Rivers in the Peel Watershed. Find out about Chevron’s Crest iron ore deposit located on the lower Snake River, and see why conservation organizations are asking the corporation to relinquish its leases for the public good.

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Peel Watershed Campaign Launches New Website

June 2nd, 2011

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed. Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area. Sign the letter of support!

The Peel Planning Commission has until the middle of July to produce their final recommended land use plan. The last round of public consultations on the plan will be from mid-August until mid-September. We expect a Yukon government decision on the future of the watershed in late October, but the mandatory fall election may push that date.

The June issue of Canadian Geographic features the Snake River, one of the celebrated Three Rivers in the Peel Watershed. Find out about Chevron’s Crest iron ore deposit located on the lower Snake River, and see why conservation organizations are asking the corporation to relinquish its leases for the public good.

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed:

A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

 

Hiking along the creek in a deep ice-carved valley near Mt. MacDonald. Juri Peepre.

Yukon First Nations Guarding Peel Watershed

April 20th, 2011

Indian Country Today- With mineral prices climbing, numerous companies with mining rights and interests in the Peel Watershed are eyeing the 16.8-million-acre northern Yukon wilderness for possible development despite the remoteness that used to make it off-limits cost-wise. Thanks to the U.N. Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which Canada adopted in November 2010, four First Nations are able to stand their ground opposing such development a little more firmly.

For the complete story, visit:

 Sunset by rapids on the Bonnet Plume River.  © Juri Peepre

 

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a 2011 trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Yukon Government and First Nations Disagree on Protection of Peel Watershed

February 24th, 2011

 

Four First Nations affected by the proposed land use plan for the Peel region are united in their goal to protect the watershed. Earlier this year, in a joint response to the recommended plan, the Chiefs said,

“We believe the entire region deserves the very highest level of protection. In our view, none of the land within the watershed should be open to industrial development.”

After years of conservation research and planning, followed by extensive public consultation showing widespread and strong support for watershed protection, the Yukon government now says that more work needs to be done to “develop a rationale” for protection.

Minister of Energy Mines and Resources Minister, Patrick Rouble, states that, “We believe a ban on surface access is not a workable scenario in a region with existing land interests and future development potential.”

Gill Cracknell, of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, asked: “could it be that the government spent all that money and then didn’t listen to what people said?”

The Yukon’s Peel River Watershed is one of the largest constellations of wild mountain rivers in North America. Industrial development threatens to fragment this stunning landscape and harm its pristine boreal mountain ecosystem. The Peel Planning Commission recommends protecting 80% of the watershed, while First Nations have called for 100% protection. Recent polls show a large majority of Yukon residents support protection. 

For information on the campaign to protect the Peel Watershed:

Paddlers in the upper canyon of the Snake River. © Juri Peepre